MORRISON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE LOCAL WATER PLAN…

 

 

CLICK HERE to view 2017 – 2022 Water Plan….

 

CLICK here to view Additional Water Plan Documents:

 

 

CLICK HERE to view…

“Morrison Minor

Watershed Prioritization

Spreadsheet”.

 

WHAT IS A WATER PLAN?

In 1977 Minnesota was stricken by drought conditions that nearly rivaled the infamous drought of the 1930s. That prompted the Legislature to seek ways to better manage the state’s water supplies, which led to the enactment of the Comprehensive Local Water Management Act (Minnesota Statutes sections 103B.301 to 103B.355) in 1985.

 

The act encourages counties outside the metropolitan area to develop and implement comprehensive water management plans. While the plans are voluntary, various state and federal grants require recipients to have an adopted local water management plan that is updated periodically (between 5 and 10 years). These local plans focus on priority concerns, defined goals and objectives, and measurable outcomes.

 

The Morrison Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) assumed the task of the local water plan update in April 2009.  

 

PURPOSE OF THE MORRISON COUNTY WATER PLAN

The purpose of the Morrison County Comprehensive Local Water Management Plan is to:

  • Identify and address existing and potential issues for the protection, management, and development of water resources and related resources in Morrison County
  • Identify priority concerns to be addressed during the effective time frame of the plan
  • Develop goals and implement actions that improve water quality and quantity and related resource management and planning in Morrison County

 

INFORMATION ABOUT THE MORRISON COUNTY WATER PLAN

The Morrison County Board of Commissioners adopted a resolution on February 10th, 2015 requiring the update and revision of the Morrison County Local Water Management Plan, as authorized under Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 103B.301, the Comprehensive Local Water Management Act.

 

On July 11, 2017, the Morrison County Board of Commissioners voted to adopt the new Morrison County Local Water Management Plan.  Many representatives from area lake associations were present to show their support of the new plan and the SWCD.  Implementation of the new plan is already underway.

 

Since the Local Water Plan by resolution can be the District’s comprehensive plan, it now will truly encompass our district goals as well as the goals of comprehensive water planning.

This plan will encompass the County as a whole, cities included, so that all agencies and units of government have a common focus on how to best utilize our resources in a conscientious manner that serves the needs of citizens, but preserves the resources for future generations.

 

Further, goals set are with a watershed approach, collaborating with our neighboring counties, recognizing that the boundaries of the County do not confine the impacts we all have on a water resource.  The task force felt strongly about the need to identify and protect the water bodies that are not “impaired” and therefore give as much or more emphasis to those waters (listed separately in this document.

 

Morrison SWCD is very excited about the new plan, and is looking forward to working with the residents and landowners of Morrison County to begin implementation.  If you have any questions, concerns, or possible projects that need to be addressed, please contact our office for assistance. lance.chisholm@mn.nacdnet.net  (320) 616-2479  x-114

 

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Local Water Plan Meeting Notice:

 

The next Local Water Plan Meeting will be…

Late Fall   (Date TBD)

(Morrison County Government Center, Meeting Room I)

  

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“It is time now to take action, as individuals and as a state, to leave a legacy of clean, safe, affordable water for ourselves, and for future generations of Minnesotans.”

                                                                                            -Governor Mark Dayton

 

Governor Dayton encouraged all Minnesotans to take a role in protecting our state’s most precious resource for future generations. The Governor called on Minnesotans to affirm their commitment to rethinking how water impacts daily life and the lives of future generation; use water efficiently and wisely in everyday activities; learn more about what individuals can do to protect and preserve water; make informed consumer choices; and to talk to one another about water protection and preservation.

(CLICK HERE to be routed to “Year of Water Action in MN” Page…)

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 YEAR OF WATER ACTION:      THEMES BY MONTH…

August 2016………..A Year of Water Action Kickoff- Conserve, Protect, Clean and Enjoy!

September 2016……..We All Live Downstream: Understanding Where Clean Water Comes From

October 2016…………Clean Water Challenges & Solutions in the Twin Cities

November 2016………Clean Water Challenges & Solutions in Greater Minnesota                                      NEWS RELEASE:     CLICK HERE…..

December 2016………Winter ways to Take Action for Clean Water                                                         “Morrison County Targeted Township

January 2017………..Clean Water Creates a Healthy Minnesota                                                                 Testing Program (2013 Summary)” 

February 2017……….Minnesota Innovations in Clean Water Practices and Technology

March 2017………….Impacts of Climate Change on Minnesota Water

April 2017………………Sustainable Practices for Clean Water

May 2017………………Keep our Waters Swimmable & Fishable

June 2017……………..Clean Water is Good for Our Economy

July 2017………………A Year of Water Action for A Future Generation

August 2017…………..A Year of Water Action in Review

 

25 by 25 Governor Meeting and Data To Come….

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County Geologic Atlases

The County Geologic Atlas provides information essential to sustainable management of ground water resources, for applications such as monitoring, water allocation, permitting, remediation, and well construction.  They define aquifer properties and boundaries, as well as the connection of aquifers to the land surface and to surface water resources.  They also provide a broad range of information on county geology, mineral resources (including construction materials), and natural history.  A complete atlas consists of a Part A prepared by Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS) that includes the water well database and 1:100,000 scale geologic maps showing properties and distribution of sediments and rocks in the subsurface, and a Part B constructed by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Division of Waters that includes maps of water levels in aquifers, direction of groundwater flow, water chemistry, and sensitivity to pollution.  Atlases are usually initiated by a request from a county and an offer to co-fund or provide in-kind service.  MGS is committed to the expeditious completion and periodic updating of atlases statewide.  GEOLOGIC ATLAS USER’S GUIDE is a document intended for people that don’t have training in geology or hydrology.  Every Minnesotan uses water, and every Minnesotan has an effect on water, so we all have a role and an interest in how that resource is distributed, how it is used, and how we affect its quality and availability.  The purpose of this Guide is to explain, through reference to County Geologic Atlas products, where our water comes from, how geology and climate control its distribution, and how we can manage water to maximize its availability at the highest quality.

The digital data for the Morrison County Geologic Atlas is now posted to the MGS website.  You can access the files via this link:  http://conservancy.umn.edu/handle/11299/163021   Here you will find PDF versions of each of the paper plates as well as a folder of all of the digital GIS files.

NOTE:  Part B Hydrogeology will be published separately by the MN Department of Natural Resources.  Expected delivery date will be 2016.

 
 

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EDUCATION

 

ANNUAL MORRISON COUNTY

6th GRADE WATER FESTIVAL

 

Conducted annually in the spring and established in 1993, the festival’s purpose is to create a better awareness of conservation and water resources through education.  The program is designed to increase the knowledge, skills and attitudes of all 6th grade students in relation to the importance of caring for the environment in which they live. We feel that the Water Festival is a fun and exciting way for students to learn more about the importance of conservation, clean water and the hydrologic cycle. This two-day event is a cooperative effort of various agencies and partners, with over 420 students attending annually.

 

Next Morrison Soil and Water District’s “Water Festival

Tuesday, September 19th and Wednesday, September 20, 2017

 

For the 24th consecutive year, the annual sixth grade Water Festival will be held at Camp Ripley.  Funded through the Morrison County Comprehensive Water Plan, it is one of the longest running educational projects held each year.

 

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The Local Water Plan is approved by the Minnesota Board of Water Resources and by resolution, adopted by the County. The plan defines how and what will be done to protect water quality in Morrison County.  Since 2009, the Morrison County Soil and Water Conservation district has administered the plan.

Welcoming the students to Camp Ripley were Post Operations Officer Major Joseph Saganoo and Morrison Soil and Water Conservation District Manager Helen McLennan.

The Water Festival is a two-day event and is attended by sixth grade classes from Little Falls, Pierz, Royalton, Swanville, and Upsala School Districts.  Learning stations are presented by the Soil and Water Conservation District, Morrison County Staff, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Minnesota Department of Military Affairs, the Minnesota Science Museum, Minnesota Department of Health, the City of Little Falls, and the City of Royalton.

Learning sessions include Conservation Jeopardy, Groundwater Resources, Wildlife and Habitat, Water Quality Indicators, Pollinators, Aquatic Invasive Species, Solar Farm Tour, The Water Cycle, and a tour of the Camp Ripley waste water treatment plant. 

The overall goal is to have students learn in a fun and exciting way what their role is in conservation stewardship of water and other natural resources.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Festival 2013 4Water Festival 2013 3Water Festival 2013 1

 

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to view larger  > >

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Nitrate Testing

Map Results

 

NITRATE TESTING

 

Two times every year, Morrison SWCD offers FREE nitrate testing of your well water.

Morrison SWCD staff will complete the testing of your nitrates.

At that time, we ask that you complete a short survey regarding your well construction and location.

This information will assist the county in gaining better knowledge of our underground water.

The nitrate test and survey only takes a few minutes to complete.  CLICK HERE to view and/or print survey.

 

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NEXT NITRATE TESTING CLINIC:

Monday, October 2nd thru Friday, October 6th, 2017

8:00 am to 4:00 pm

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Previous Nitrate Clinic Test Results

Conducted: May 9 – 13, 2016

239 Water Samples / Wells Tested

0 – 4.9ppm = 165 Samples or 69%

5 – 9.9ppm = 39 Samples or 16%

> 10.0ppm = 35 Samples or 15%

Conducted: October 5 – 9, 2015

84 Water Samples / Wells Tested

0 – 4.9ppm = 64 Samples or 76%

5 – 9.9ppm = 13 Samples or 15%

> 10.0ppm = 7 Samples or 8%

Conducted: May 11 – 15, 2015

88 Water Samples / Wells Tested

0 – 4.9ppm = 60 Samples or 68%

5 – 9.9ppm = 11 Samples or 13%

> 10.0ppm = 17 Samples or 19%

Conducted: October 6 – 10, 2014

41 Water Samples / Wells Tested

0 – 4.9ppm = 22 Samples or 53%

5 – 9.9ppm = 8 Samples or 20%

> 10.0ppm = 11 Samples or 27%

Conducted: May 12 – 16, 2014

46 Water Samples / Wells Tested

0 – 4.9ppm = 25 Samples or 54%

5 – 9.9ppm = 10 Samples or 22%

> 10.0ppm = 11 Samples or 24%

Conducted: October 7 – 11, 2013

61 Water Samples / Wells Tested

0 – 4.9ppm = 34 Samples or 56%

5 – 9.9ppm = 17 Samples or 28%

> 10.0ppm = 10 Samples or 16%

Conducted: April 29 – May 3, 2013 and May 6 – 10, 2013

239 Water Samples / Wells Tested

0 – 4.9ppm = 165 Samples or 69%

5 – 9.9ppm = 39 Samples or 16%

> 10.0ppm = 35 Samples or 15%

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CLICK HERE to read more about the Central Sands Private Well Monitoring Network…… In the spring of 2011, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) began the Central Sands Private Well Monitoring Network. During the first year, MDA coordinated the random sampling of 1,555 private drinking water wells throughout Central Minnesota and samples were analyzed for nitrate nitrogen. Home owners from 14 counties participated in this project which was supported by the Clean Water Fund. Over 88.6 percent of the wells sampled had nitrate concentrations less than 3 mg/L, 6.8 percent of the wells ranged from 3-10 mg/L of nitrate and 4.6 percent were greater than 10 mg/L of nitrate as nitrogen. Older, shallower wells tended to have a higher percentage of nitrate results above 10 mg/L. The data collected in 2011 was used to determine current nitrate concentrations, determine areas of concern, and to develop a long-term trend network.

Test Results to come…

 

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What is Nitrate?
 
Nitrate (NO3) is a naturally occurring chemical made of nitrogen and oxygen. Nitrate is found in air, soil, water, and plants. Much of the nitrate in our environment comes from decomposition of plants and animal wastes. People also add nitrate to the environment in the form of fertilizers.
 
 
Why Test For Nitrates?
 
Nitrate is the most common pollutant found in rural wells in Morrison County. Nitrate in drinking water presents a serious problem for infants up to about six months of age, and for pregnant women. Too much nitrate in infants can reduce the amount of oxygen carried by blood. This is known as “Blue Baby Syndrome.”
 
 
How Much Nitrate is Too Much?
 
The state Health Risk Limit for nitrate is 10 mg/L of nitrate-nitrogen, which provides newborns with reasonable protection against blue baby syndrome. This level is mandatory for all public water systems, and recommended for private wells.
 
 
How Do I Test My Well For Nitrates?
 
Step 1 –   Allow your faucet to run for approximately 2 minutes.
 
Step 2 –  Collect a sample of water in a new, resealable, plastic bag.
                                                                                    (approx. 1 cup)
 
Step 3 –  Bring sample to the Morrison SWCD to be tested for nitrates.
 
Step 4 – SWCD Staff will test your water for nitrate.
 
Step 5 – Landowner will complete a short SURVEY regarding your well construction and location. CLICK HERE.
 
 
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Who can I contact to have additional tests completed on my well water?
 
Morrison County Public Health provides testing kits for you to pick up in the basement of the Government Center. (213 1st Ave. SE)
 
1. Choose which certified laboratory you would like to deliver your test kit to.
 
2. Choose what you want your water to be tested for. (Nitrates, Coliform Bacteria, Arsenic, Lead, Fluoride, Iron, Manganese, Hardness, Sulfate) 
 
3. Prices vary, but usually fall in the range of $20 – $40.
 
4. Follow the instructions on the test kit.
 
5. Personally deliver the kit to the certified laboratory of your choice.
 
 
CLICK HERE….. To view a list of all STATE-CERTIFIED LABORATORIES. (MDH Certified Environmental Laboratories)  Be sure that the laboratory you choose is state certified to perform each test you want.

 

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For more information, CLICK HERE to visit the Minnesota Department of Health Website

 

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11

 

PROTECT OUR

PRECIOUS WATER

 

“Sealing Your Unused Well”

 

Video Published on Jan 8, 2014

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKS4OknlYO4&feature=c4-overview&list=UUzyev_TJ-jgpqIBhsEn4QDg

This video shows the highlights on the need to protect our drinking water by having old, unused wells, permanently sealed.

Unused or “abandoned” wells can be a threat to our drinking water supplies, public health and safety.

Minnesotans can do their part to protect and preserve our drinking water by having their unused wells properly sealed by a licensed well contractor.

The video features a well owner, two local well contractors and a hydrologist from the MDH.

In many areas well sealing grant money is available to help well owners pay a portion of the costs.